Archives: March 2016

Where’d You Get That Dress? FTC Dresses Down Lord & Taylor Native Advertising

This week the FTC settled charges against Lord & Taylor from alleged deceptive native advertising during its March 2015 Design Lab social media campaign. http://1.usa.gov/22h3sJ7 A big takeaway from this settlement is the FTC’s position that a company not only has to comply with the Native Advertising/Endorsement disclosures on its own social media platforms, but also has to ensure (by contract and monitoring) that its paid endorsers make the requisite disclosures on their own social media posts.

For its sales campaign, L&T focused on one product, the Paisley Asymmetrical Dress, to flood the Internets. The native advertising included:

  • L&T gave the Dress to 50 select fashion influencers (what a job!) who were paid $1,000-$4,000 to post pictures of themselves on Instagram wearing the Dress. By contract, L&T required them to use “@lordandtaylor” and “#DesignLab” in the posts. The contract did not require the influencers to disclose in their postings that they had been compensated by L&T. L&T pre-approved each of the posts to ensure use of the user designation and hashtag. None of the posts had any endorsement disclosure and L&T did not add any.
  • L&T contracted with the fashion magazine Nylon to run an article with a picture of the Dress, which L&T pre-approved. L&T did not require Nylon to disclose the relationship in the article.
  • L&T also contracted with Nylon to post a picture of the Dress on Nylon’s Instagram page; again, no disclosure requirement.

The campaign was a huge success; it reached 11.4 million Instagram users and produced over 300,000 brand engagements; and the Dress sold out in days. But while women everywhere said yes to the Dress, the FTC said bad to the ads. (more…)

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Cause Marketing Lessons from the Wounded Warrior Project Scandal

Your company just made a major announcement that it is partnering with a charity that you now find is involved in a scandal. What can you do?

The recent ousting of The Wounded Warriors Project CEO and COO amid allegations of lavish spending on travel, conferences and public relations requires a company to examine their cause marketing campaigns. While there is no need to throw the baby out with the bath water – recent studies still confirm that consumers, and in particular Millennials, strongly support buying from companies associated with a cause* — picking the right charity is critical.

*For example, according to the 2015 Cone Communications Millennial CSR Study, “More than nine-in-10 Millennials would switch brands to one associated with a cause (91% vs. 85% U.S. average).” (more…)

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