Posts Tagged: Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act

Playing for Keeps: Daily Fantasy Football 2016

When the last online fantasy football game was played, the attorneys general of New York, Nevada and Illinois were throwing penalty flags, state legislators was huddling to set the next play, and the daily fantasy sports leagues were taking it on the chin.

Where are we now? Here’s a 50 state survey:

DFS expressly allowed: CO, IN, KS, MD, MA, MS, MO, NY, RI, TN, WV, VA

Contested: AL, DE, GA, HI, ID, IL, NV, SD, TX

Banned: AZ, IO, LA, MT, WA

Proposed legislation: CA, CT, FL, KY, MI, MN, NE, NJ, NM, OK, PA, SC, WI

No legislation: AS, AK, ME, NH, NC, ND, OH, OR, UT, WY

How about this stat: leading up to the 2015 NFL season, daily fantasy sports leagues spent over $750 million in ads – more than the entire beer industry. In 2015, the top two companies had recorded a combined $3 billion in player entry fees. (more…)

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Competitive Video Gambling: The Secret Hobby Going on in Your Basement

Competitive video gaming is a somewhat recent attraction for (mostly) young adult boys and (mostly) men who think they are young adult boys. I’ve even seen my young adult son watch YouTube videos of other people playing video games. (Don’t shame me as a parent.) Competitive video gambling is what happens when people decide to bet on the outcome of others playing video games. Class actions are what happen when the unlucky gamblers decide to sue.

Recently, one of these gamblers brought a putative class action against the publisher and developer of the video game Counter Strike: Global Offensive (or in vid game talk, CS:GO) claiming that the game allowed for illegal gambling, the “contract” he entered into with the developer was invalid, and of course, he should get restitution for his losses.

In my real simple terms, gathered from the Complaint, CS:GO matches are streamed live on websites like Twitch; user accounts can be linked to third-party (international) websites; and players can purchase “skins” which can be used like casino chips to place bets on the games. (more…)

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Maybe it is Gambling – Fantasy Sports Leagues Under Fire

This week we wrote that fantasy sports leagues were (arguably) legal because they are games of skill under the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act (UIGEA). Yesterday, however, the Nevada Gaming Control Board concluded – after several months of investigation – the pay-to-play daily fantasy sports leagues (DFS) were gambling under the Nevada Revised Statues and therefore, the operators must possess a gaming license from the Nevada Gaming Commission. The full Notice to Licensees of the Legality of Offering Daily Fantasy Sports in Nevada is set forth here. In response, the two largest daily fantasy sports operators, DraftKings and FanDuel, issued statements that they are, at least temporarily, suspending operation in Nevada. (more…)

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